Smooting Taurus 94 trigger

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birdman
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Smooting Taurus 94 trigger

Post by birdman » Thu Feb 20, 2014 11:49 am

I recently bought a Taurus 94. As with most of these rimfire revolvers the trigger sucks.

My question is "What is the down side of removing the side plate, flooding the area with Flitz (or other metal polish) replacing the sideplate & dryfiring a thousand times or so, then flushing the gun with GunScrubber to clean it all out. Is there a risk of doing some real damage?

I bought the gun as a training tool for little old ladies who don't have a lot of hand strength & with the trigger the way it is now this gun is a non-starter....


Thanks,

Allan
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jazzmanDK
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Re: Smooting Taurus 94 trigger

Post by jazzmanDK » Thu Feb 20, 2014 12:06 pm

Off topic but worth noting: your typo on 'smoothing' recalled a take of a group of MIT students who established the length of the Harvard Bridge from Boston to Cambridge, Massachusetts as three hundred and some odd Smoots and an ear' Google it for an entertaining read!

Zip
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Cardboard_killer
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Re: Smooting Taurus 94 trigger

Post by Cardboard_killer » Thu Feb 20, 2014 1:32 pm

birdman wrote:My question is "What is the down side of removing the side plate, flooding the area with Flitz (or other metal polish) replacing the sideplate & dryfiring a thousand times or so, then flushing the gun with GunScrubber to clean it all out. Is there a risk of doing some real damage?
Yes, don't do it.

There are a number of good videos out there on how to smooth and lighten a S&W revolver. I believe the Taurus has most in common with a J-frame S&W (coil mainspring). If you take off the side plate and lightly polish a couple of area you will do a lot of good. I would concentrate on smoothing the rebound slide. The hammer and trigger are very delicate--taking off too much metal can cause big problems. Remember, it's easy to take off metal and impossible to add it back on.

In addition, go to Wolff springs and buy lighter springs (mainspring and rebound spring). I think you can use the S&W springs if there are no Wolff specific springs. I recommend buying a pack of them at different weights, then you can experiment. If the spring is too weak, you will get light strikes, especially in DA.

I did a trigger job on a Rossi clone once, and it came out pretty good. As you say, however, rimfire requires a stronger strike, so any rimfire revolver is going to be tricky to get right.

EDIT: My local gunsmith will do a S&W trigger job for about $80. Unless you want to take up S&W gunsmithing as a hobby, it may be worth the money to have it done without any of the headaches, and there are a lot of headaches the first time you take a revolver apart. Once you get the hang of it, though, it is quite fun and not very difficult.
Brian
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